Having a pacemaker fitted

Morning to everyone
As some of you may know I developed a heart issue a few months ago
I saw the consultant yesterday and he says I need a pacemaker. Tachycardia and bradycardia was mentioned. (Brady/tachy)
I’m relieved to have an answer and he told me my general health is very good,. Great to hear.
Anyone have experience of having a pacemaker?
I’m not overly concerned or anxious but be interesting to hear about others. Have to start the anticoagulant today

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@Pet66……my aunt had a pacemaker fitted and had no problems with it and no further issues with her heart…

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Hi Pet

I have a friend who is now in his mid thirties. He had a pacemaker fitted when he was 14 ! Before long he was able to carry on with sports at school and leads an absolutely normal life with no problems. He’s on his third now as his first had battery issues (remember that was more than two decades ago so technology has advanced) and the next replacement was routine. Apart form a small lump high in his chest, you wouldn’t know there was anything ‘different’ about him. He does have to be careful around security scanners at airports etc, but I think he just likes the attention and finding someone he fancies to pat him down! (an upside to everything!!)

When he first told me my reaction was ‘oh crumbs, not sure I’d like that’ but he said it was painless part from a little bruising after the procedure. Now he doesn’t even think about it and said mostly he isn’t even aware that if it has fired to keep him in rhythm and only finds out when he has a regular check and they tell him how it’s been working.

So glad you know what it is and have a solution coming up.

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Pet, so glad you have some answers and a planned treatment for it.

Had to check with my sister, our Grandma had one - meant she was able to go on decent walks with their little dog and carry out all the activities she wanted to.

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Thank you all for replying
Very reassuring.
I need my life back on track. I walk and do jobs at a much slower pace, which can be irritating but ok. The awful thing is the anxiety I can feel if going out and about, will I start to feel faint. Always have a drink with me.
Apparently after the pacemaker is fitted , I will need some medication.
Joining my family and friends who are all on some form of medication!

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@Pet66 I’m happy to hear you finally have some solid answers now. As everyone’s said a pacemaker is a very routine standard thing to have these days, and these medications too.
Sending some warm hugs and soothing wishes that this gives you back your confidence and the reassurance you need.

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HUGS Pet. I don’t like going to hospital on my own, yet another of those times when we have no choice but to be brave.

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Thank you BB
My son in law was able to take me, which was pleased about. I couldn’t tell him how felt as I would have hubby. He had an errand to do as well so he wasn’t waiting with me. Came back to take me home. I did feel it, as we do seeing ,other couples together.
So yes as you say have to be brave

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Mum and my sister-in-law both had pacemakers fitted. Mum’s heart rate was sometimes as low as 15…funny thing was that she always seemed to be aware of the pacemaker even when she wasn’t aware of very much else. But never any problems with it. Sister-in-law is on her second - first one was in about 2011: no problems at all

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Been doing a bit of research about having the pacemaker fitted. Mustn’t get too overwhelmed about the dos and don’ts.
I am a bit concerned about my hob though as it’s induction. Mixed information about the magnetic workings interfering with a pacemaker. I love my induction hob and would rather not change to ceramic. Don’t want the expense either. :woman_shrugging:t2:

Oh @Pet66 that’s the problem with doing extra research isn’t it?

I’d suggest you just give the clinic a call to let them know and they’ll be able to confirm if there is likely to be a problem - that way you will know the FACTS rather than general advice/comments. Remember that like medications, they have to list all the possible problems to cover themselves. I had to have a tooth root extracted under surgery and the surgeon had to inform me that the anaesthetic COULD kill me… (So can crossing the road was my reply).

Don’t worry until you have to!

I emailed the consultants secretary. Had phone call today.I can keep my induction hob. Good. The not quite so good is it’s about 6month waiting time. At least I know now so not wondering all of the time. Xx

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Well that is good new about the hob - waiting list sigh just another hurdle to clamber over, isn’t it? Keeping reminding yourself that the time will soon pass and at least you know roughly when it will be done. It could be worse and you were not given an estimate of the time. Also make sure they know if you can get in at short notice. I’ve done that before with Graham and it’s worked so well - a phone call asking if we could go in next day instead of four weeks time as someone had cancelled. If I say I bit the lady’s hand off it’s an understatement…

Good luck.

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@Chris_22081
Thanks Chris
I mentioned that could go in at short notice. She said it doesn’t work like that unfortunately because next in line would be seen earlier. Perhaps nearer the time a few days before appointment it may. Its amazing how I feel better for at least knowing. Will have to monitor as my resting heart rate has been dropping these last few days. Will have to make an appointment with GP and have another ECG that can be sent to the hospital.

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